Re-imagined Surgery

Innovation has created a unique symbiosis between the healthcare and technology sectors.Surgical operations were performed thousands of years ago. It is estimated that the first one was performed in ancient Egypt, over 35,00 years ago. Funnily enough, just a couple of years ago, NASA announced a collaboration on the development of a tiny robot that […]

Innovation has created a unique symbiosis between the healthcare and technology sectors.
Surgical operations were performed thousands of years ago. It is estimated that the first one was performed in ancient Egypt, over 35,00 years ago. Funnily enough, just a couple of years ago, NASA announced a collaboration on the development of a tiny robot that can be placed
inside the human body and controlled remotely by a surgeon.

The future of surgery is subjected to a not-so-wide range of technologies that have been
outlined below.

  1. Virtual Reality- Not so long ago, in April 2016, Shafi Ahmed, a cancer surgeon, performed an entire operation using VR at the Royal London Hospital. The operation was a milestone in the field of surgery and was observed around the world by other surgeons and medical students.
  2. Augmented Reality- Although AR users do not lose their connection with their surroundings, technology has incredible potential in making surgeries more efficient.
    The technology also has incredible benefits in educating new surgeons on a wide range of subjects, by giving them a better understanding and view of human anatomy.
  3. Surgical Robotics- Robotic Surgery is becoming more and more prominent in major medical facilities around the world. It provides a better surgery experience to both the patient and surgeon. The surgeries are cleaner, faster, less evasive and offer a much
    faster recovery time.
  4. 3D Printing- Hours of planning and risky operations can now be avoided thanks to 3D printing. In March 2016 in China, a team of experienced doctors decided to build a full-sized model of the heart of a small baby born with a heart defect. Their aim was to
    pre-plan an extremely complicated surgery on the tiny heart. The little boy survived the surgery with no side effects.

Technology and the medical sector will continue complementing each other for much of the foreseeable future. Developments in both these fields of work will only result in a much better experience for both operators and patients.

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